• Internet
    Unbundling the internet and data ownership
    AOL used to be internet in the US, there was Minitel in France and i-mode in Japan. All of them were widely successful in their day but turned into obscurity when disrupted by more open and distributed solutions. There’s a law which says something like “any institution always strives to become more powerful over time”. I can’t find the source of this law, but it applies to any organization - commercial or non-commercial. In their strive to become more dominant in a market or sector, they typically strive to centralization of power, influence, usage and product.
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  • Random Thought
    Back to the future – hello WordPress
    After a journey of a few years to Medium and then Squarespace, my blog is back on a self-hosted WordPress site. I've been blogging for a decade and hosting my own website for two. Here's the story.
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  • Random Thought
    Trying something new – RSS to email
    There are quite a few blogs I like to follow and I visited them regularly to see if there was an update. But since the update intervals for each of these were very different, regularly visiting wasn’t really working for me. There must be a better solution to this.
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  • Random Thought
    Disrupting Facebook and Google

    NYMag poses the question if Facebook and Google be disrupted? The writer argues that both have self-enforcing network-of-networks which makes it much harder up to impossible to disrupt them - harder than Facebook overtaking MySpace and Google overtaking AltaVista. The answer is yes and no.

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  • Random Thought
    I won
    Three years ago I started on a quest to get rid of all newsletters, retention emails and other commercial (to me) non-relevant emails. My inbox was overflowing with emails I did not care about and I noticed I was mostly idly swiping away to delete these emails without ever reading them. It was time to do something about it.
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  • Random Thought
    Peak attention

    We've reached peak attention on the internet. Time spent online is not significantly growing anymore. The internet has generated 4 champions (Google, Apple, Facebook & Amazon) who together dominate for the most part how you spent your time online. These companies are now at their peak and they have the momentum to buy, absorb or change their tactics to fend off any competitor. 

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  • Random Thought
    Web vs native apps

    The big promise of web 2.0 was that eventually all applications would run inside a web browser and that native apps would go away. This was in early 2000s. We’ve come a long way since then. Mobile hardware and networks significantly faster today. Web technologies have matured as well. Can web apps take over native?

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  • Random Thought
    Future platforms

    The major platforms emerging at the end of 20th century were computers and the internet. Both are approaching maturity levels. Each platform created new champions. Let's explore a bit on possible future platforms and what they could be.

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  • Internet
    Artificial scarcity in the broadband market

    The broadband market is changing. Consumers — and especially the younger demographics — are ‘cord cutting’. The cable companies made lots of money with offering Triple Play packages (Internet, TV and telephony) but now they are confronted with changing behavior which leads to price erosion.

    The cable industry is fighting back by putting artificial data-caps in place so they've a way out to increase prices down the line.

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  • Internet
    The future battleground of internet access

    Historically, cable companies have de facto monopolies or duopolies in the areas they serve. It gave them significant market power on consumers & broadcasters alike. There was little choice than to just deal with them.

    The market is slowly changing though. Phone services are not as important as they once were since consumers start to rely solely on their mobile phones. At the same time is television moving towards the internet. This leaves the cable companies with only a dumb data pipe towards the internet.

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